Docket # FSIS-2008-0028

I am writing to urge you to reject the American Meat Institute petition to use
carcass irradiation as a processing aid.

Irradiation of meat, no matter what the dose, alters the chemistry of food.
Even low-dose irradiation has been found to create dangerous
byproducts such as 2-ACBs.  For other foods, irradiation is categorized
as a food additive and this is how it should continue to be regulated.
And it is entirely unacceptable that this petition asks for permission
to use irradiation without any labeling requirement.  Consumers need to
know if irradiation is used in the processing of their food.

I am opposed to the use of irradiation no matter how it is
categorized or at what stage of processing it is used.  I urge the
agency not to approve this petition.  Consumers need USDA to strengthen
microbial testing in meat plants, not more reliance on failed
technologies like irradiation.

Sincerely,

Click Here to Sign Petition

Advertisements

Minnesota Public Radio

For those of you who faithfully stay abreast of what is happening with American agriculture and the meat industry;  this ones for you.

The U.S. Olympic team decided to take its own food to Beijing after a massive chicken breast is found to contain high levels of steroids.  So they’re bringing free range or something…nope, more like KFC.

Here’s that report…

Under pressure from lawmakers the Department of Agriculture (USDA) released a list of all schools nationwide that received beef included in last months recall.  Since the recall spanned a 2 year period, the complete list resulted in a 226 page document that named all school food authorities who received beef processed at the Westland/Hallmark slaughterhouse.

Even though there were no reported illness associated with the recall, the meat was recalled because some of the cows  processed could not stand on their own and are typically banned from the human food supply because they are more susceptible to illnesses including mad cow disease. While officials insist that the risk is very remote the incubation period for the human form of mad cow disease reportedly could be as long as long as 30 years.

Full List of School District

WASHINGTON (AP) — Under pressure from the food industry, the Agriculture Department is considering a proposal not to identify retailers where tainted meat went for sale except in cases of serious health risk, The Associated Press has learned.

Had that been the rule in place last month, consumers would not have been told if their supermarkets sold meat from a Southern California slaughterhouse that triggered the biggest beef recall in U.S. history. Read the full story —> USDA Might Limit Meat Recall Information.

I try to keep readers update on the developments in the Westland/ Hallmark Meats beef recall story.  Earlier today MSNBC reported that one of the workers charged with abuse plead guilty and was sentenced to six months in jail.

While all that was good and fine the story went on to report,

Downer cattle have been largely barred from the food supply since a mad cow disease scare in 2003. The cows pose a higher risk of disease, partly because they often wallow in feces. “

Downer cows have not been LARGELY BARRED, the cows this article was referring to were BANNED from the food supply.

The sentence that follows, “The cows pose a higher risk of disease, partly because they often wallow in feces”,  is even more bewildering because it has nothing to do with mad cow disease it is referring to E-coli contamination which comes from feces…. a disease not mentioned at all in this particular article. When read in the same paragraph a reader could easily conclude that feces have something to do with mad cow disease when in fact they are discussing the increased potential for E-coli contamination.

The fact that a cow can’t walk could indicate that the animal is suffering from the neurological symptoms associated with mad cow disease, but a non-ambulatory cow is also more likely to contaminate meat with E-coli because they are on the ground where cows poop. 

Side Stepping the Poo,

Olive Rockfish

San Bernardino County

By JANET ZIMMERMAN
The Press-Enterprise
From Slim Jim jerky and Jenny Craig meatloaf to Farmer John salami and Kids Cuisine frozen tacos, the list of products containing recalled meat from the now-closed Chino slaughterhouse continues to grow.

The California Department of Public Health now lists 466 types of foods sold to markets, restaurants, grocery chains, catering businesses, workplace cafeterias and other food services. The state expects the list to get longer, department spokeswoman Lea Brooks said.

“We’re identifying more products in which the recalled beef was an ingredient,” she said….–>Full Story

Business that may have used the beef

Recalled Product List