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Docket # FSIS-2008-0028

I am writing to urge you to reject the American Meat Institute petition to use
carcass irradiation as a processing aid.

Irradiation of meat, no matter what the dose, alters the chemistry of food.
Even low-dose irradiation has been found to create dangerous
byproducts such as 2-ACBs.  For other foods, irradiation is categorized
as a food additive and this is how it should continue to be regulated.
And it is entirely unacceptable that this petition asks for permission
to use irradiation without any labeling requirement.  Consumers need to
know if irradiation is used in the processing of their food.

I am opposed to the use of irradiation no matter how it is
categorized or at what stage of processing it is used.  I urge the
agency not to approve this petition.  Consumers need USDA to strengthen
microbial testing in meat plants, not more reliance on failed
technologies like irradiation.

Sincerely,

Click Here to Sign Petition

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) has confirmed bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in British Columbia.

History: Keep Mad Cow out of the US

The 2003 discovery of the first case of mad cow disease in the United States cast serious doubts on years of reassurances from the meat industry and the USDA that it couldn’t happen here.  Now the USDA and the big meat companies want consumers to believe them again.  We need your help to keep Mad Cow Disease out of the U.S.

For the last three years, the USDA has been trying to open the border to Canadian cattle over the age of thirty months.  This is significant because older cattle (those over thirty months of age) are considered to be at higher risk for having Mad Cow Disease and therefore pose a greater risk if they enter the food supply.  Canada has had 13 cases of Mad Cow Disease, the most recent of which was discovered in June.

So why would the United States take older, high risk cattle from a country known to have a significant prevalence of this disease?  The meat companies want to be able to source cattle from wherever they are the cheapest, which is often Canada.

Combined with the known problems in U.S. slaughterhouses in following the rules for handling the risky nervous system materials believed to spread the disease, importing older Canadian cattle creates unnecessary risk for U.S. consumers. 

Tell USDA to put public health before meat industry profits and not to open the border to older Canadian cattle. Take Action Now.

Thanks for taking action,
Patty Lovera, Deputy Director
Food & Water Watch

Sign petition to keep Mad Cow out of the US 

Minnesota Public Radio

For those of you who faithfully stay abreast of what is happening with American agriculture and the meat industry;  this ones for you.

The U.S. Olympic team decided to take its own food to Beijing after a massive chicken breast is found to contain high levels of steroids.  So they’re bringing free range or something…nope, more like KFC.

Here’s that report…

A Family Fighting for Answers

—— Portsmouth Woman Dies from what doctors believe could be the human form of mad cow disease, autopsy to confirm.

—>Portsmouth woman may have the human form of mad cow disease.